The Center for Atmospheric Sciences | » Alima S. Diawara

    • Bachelor, Applied Physics, University of Bamako, 2006

    • Master, Atmospheric Science, Mie University, 2011

    • Email

      alima.diawara@my.hamptonu.edu

  • Project Links

  • News

  • Alima S. Diawara

    I have 5 years experience in teaching 3rd and 4th grade students at Mie university, at two faculties of the University of Mali through United Nations Development Program (UNDP) project named TOKTEN, I have a combined of 10 years experience on the field (on the sea, on the mountain, in the forest) including short forecast for agriculture and raw-data collecting with radiosonde equipment (VAISALA, MEISEI). My research field focused on the mechanism of climate change in global scale , and particularly on Sahel region.

    I am currently a second year Ph.D student studying Atmospheric Science at the Department of Atmospheric and Planetary Science, Hampton University and Dr. Nicholas Heavens as my supervisor. My research is focused on a reconstruction of glacial dust cycling during the Late Paleozoic Ice Age, which should help identify new areas to search for evidence of dust deposition. At this point we are simulating a 100 years recorded using CCSM 3 on Yellowstone server at NCAR(for details please refer to the link below).

    In June 2016, I taught 3 weeks at Faculty of Science and Technology in Mali financed by Dust in Late Paleozoic and the United Nation Development Programme through TOKTEN Programme. I trained 12 Assistants of Research in Meteorology Dynamics.

     

    Publications


    -Paturel. J.E., Diawara. A.,Siou. L.K.,Talin. E.,Ferry. L., Mahe. G.,Dezetter. A., Muther. N., Martin. D., Rouche. Nathalie., L’Aour. A., Seguis. L., Coulibaly. N., Kone. B.S., Koite. M; 2010: Caractérisation d’une sécheresse hydropluviométrique sur le bassin du Bani,ANR-06-VULN-017; http://www.hydrosciences.fr/ressac/

    Diawara. A,Tachibana. Y.,Oshima. K.,Nishikawa .H.,Ando .Y.,2016: Synchrony of trend shifts in Sahel boreal summer rainfall and global oceanic evaporation, 1950–2012,Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1–10; http://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/20/1/2016/, doi:10.5194/hess-20-1-2016.

    Project: Dust in the Late Paleozoic Ice Age

    View Project Page

    Background Between 2010 and 2012, Dr. Nicholas Heavens was a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University. While there, he explored the climate of the Earth during a putative minimum in atmospheric carbon dioxide and maximum in glaciation around 300 million years ago (the Late Paleozoic Ice Age). He […]